Second Hand or Vintage?

Fortunately thrift store shopping has become trendy, meaning it might be fun to find vintage, collectibles, antiques, even wearable fashionable clothing.  I’m from a time period when shopping at thrift stores was not a happy symbol of status in society, rather a need based on income, so thrifty though it might be, it was worrisome to wear the badge of experience I have earned and learned over the years in being thrifty.  Now the terminology of thrift shopping, vintage, collectibles, antiques, diy,  make overs,  recycle, upcycle and repurpose take in the broadness of the definitions of thrifty.  And sometimes it isn’t thrifty at all, yet with the crash of the economy it has become fashionable to approach projects in a thrifty way.   So goodbye to the awkwardness, even embarrassment of using the word thrifty as having yesterday’s meanings attached to it.

The ol' Skinflint --- from thrifty to downright cheap.

The ol’ Skinflint — from thrifty to downright cheap.

Today, shopping at thrift stores could well mean a number of things.  It could mean a vintage consignment store, it could mean give aways that have more to do with the mercurial changing fashions, or changing tastes, impulse buys causing second thoughts post purchase, re-gifting, or just flat out items that don’t fit well, don’t work well in fashion, or decor.  It could mean looking for those hard to find items that are yesterday’s treasures and part of a movement back to retro is cool today.  With advances made over the years in social media,  Pinterest, Facebook, even smart phones with selfies and instant photos, my little corner of the world has been assimilated into a much broader spectrum.   And on that note, it helps me to think about expanding what I post to this blog on a different scale.  I so worried about copyright in those early days of blogging, and now well as long as the credit goes to where the idea came from ….. right?

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Ditch your dryer sheets!

AFeatured image Skinflint kind of idea, except now some of the thrifty ideas are considered as being good to our universe – sustainable living.

Sustainable Stories

Written by Bethany Kogut

One thing that you can’t live without doing is your laundry, but sadly it is not the most sustainable action. On average, an older washing machine, like those typically in on-campus residence halls, use 40-45 gallons of water per load. In order to do your part and run a sustainable load of laundry, it is important to make sure you don’t run a load until it is completely full. I know I am not very committed to the rules of colors and temperatures, and I’ve only dyed one white tank top pink. It may be beneficial to mix together some colors to fill up a complete load, with caution of course! One other way to make your laundry more sustainable is to make your own reusable dryer ball to keep your dryer, clothes, and planet away from toxic chemicals used as a softener. This can be…

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